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Madison Youth Football League History
The History of Madison Youth Football

In 1968, a group of Madisonites led by Vince Lipnicki and Joe Klimas organized the Madison Quarterback Club. It began as an intra-Madison league with four flag division teams and four tackle division teams. In 1969, with the addition of two traveling tackle divisions, the Shoreline Conference was formed. The towns of Madison, Old Saybrook, Clinton, and Deep River were joined with St. John's School in Deep River to make up the League.

Throughout the 1970's and early '80's the Madison Quarterback Club was the benchmark for the other Shoreline Conference towns. Madison always had the most knowledgeable coaches and supportive parents teaching and encouraging the players. Under the direction of Dick Arcand, the Madison Quarterback Club helped instill the love of football into countless young men, and also introduced a standard of excellence that became synonymous with Madison Football.

Since the inception in 1968 the ultimate goal of Madison's youth football program was to be the learning grounds for future Daniel Hand High School players "teaching tomorrow's Tigers". Since the early 1970's when legendary coach Larry Ciotti started the Hand program, the Madison Quarterback Club and the Hand Tigers have always been supportive of and reliant upon each other. Many of the all-time great Hand Tigers played their youth football in the Madison system: Al Jarecki, Ken Punzelt, Ken Sweitzer, Jim Bell, Scott Sweitzer, Dave Thompson. The support that the Hand Tigers and their coaches have given has been and remains an important part of the success of youth football in Madison.

The mid-to-late 1980's were an exciting time for Madison football. With tremendous coaches like Dan Zaneski and Mike Teague, Madison continued to produce excellent football players and teams. A lso, the Shoreline Conference converted from a five-team league into a ten-town league known as the Shoreline Youth Football Conference. With the addition of a third tackle division to the new SYFC, the Madison Quarterback Club was forced to drop their flag division teams. With a name change of their own, the Madison Quarterback Club became known as the Madison Youth Football League. Bob Davis, MYFL's President and SYFC's secretary, was such an integral player in the SYFC's changes that today's SYFC Championship Trophy is given in his name.

The 1990's saw the Madison Youth Football League at the top of the SYFC in many aspects. Not just with championship trophies, but mainly with quality people who cared about the progress of the program. In 1994, Chip Frey had the unenviable task of finding the right person to continue the successful running of the MYFL after the untimely death of Bob Davis. Walt Reynolds was that man. Walt, along with Fernando Mesa, was committed to keeping Madison as the class of the SYFC. Walt transformed the relationship between the MYFL and the Daniel Hand Tiger program into a partnership. With the help of Tigers head coach Steve Filippone, yearly coaching clinics were given to the MYFL coaches by the Hand staff. In 1999, Coach Filippone helped all of the MYFL coaches to convert to a common defense. The 4-4 defense was just the beginning for the common system that was to be introduced. President Leo Kent's idea for continuity throughout the MYFL came to fruition. Presently all of the MYFL teams speak the same terminology, teach the same techniques, practice the same drills, and implement the same strategies.

The 20th century ended with Madison Youth Football in outstanding shape. More players than ever participated. In 1998 Brie Maniero put the gender issue aside and played on the Youth Division level. The record is not clear whether she was the first female ever to play youth football in Madison, however it is a good guess that she was the first female ever to score a touchdown.

In 2000, for the second time in four years, Madison took home two Shoreline Conference Championships (Senior and Youth Division) and one runner-up trophy (Junior Division). During the 2005-2008 seasons Madison won two of the three division championships.

As the word spread regarding the success of the program, the numbers of participants grew. In 2001, with a 50% increase in numbers from the previous year, the Madison program was 155 players strong. Unprecedented in the Shoreline Conference, Madison was the first town to field two senior division teams, as well as the first with three youth division teams. Madison Youth Football has now held steady at approximately 200 players during the past four seasons as well as 100 5-8 year olds and approximately 100 cheerleaders.

The success of the MYF program is the ability of our teams to scrimmage one of the best teams in the league every Tuesday and Thursday night. While other towns must practice against their own second team MYF squads can square off against each other.

During the 2004 season Prasident Faz Bagnoli along with Vice-President Ed Brunt instituted "positon time" on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Position time is a forty-five minute section of practice where the players are divided by position and instructed in fundementals by the best teachers  MYF has to offer in each position. Position time was intended to standardize coaching throughtout MYF and insure that all players received the same quality of coaching. Position time has allowed MYF to operate as a "turn-key" operation year to year, as the players change teams, but the techniques remain the same.

Additionally, MYF is committed to working closely with the DHHS staff to insure that our phraseology and techniques are the same as those taught by the Hand staff. This standardization allows the players to step into the DHHS freshman huddle with a strong background in the "Hand Way".

Coaching clinics are run from March-May where the DHHS staff, guest speakers and MYF Position Coordinators teach the "Program" to all interested coaches. As a result, MYF starts each season with seventy engaged and knowledable coaches who are all teaching the techniques approved by DHHS and MYF.

Presently, Madison Youth Football remains a positive influence on the youth of Madison by exemplifying good sportsmanship, by accentuating the value of teamwork, and by teaching the importance of commitment; none of which can be done without the tremendous effort of every volunteer past and present.



Shoreline Conference Championships

8th Grade

2011 champions
2010 champions


7th Grade
2011 runner up
2010 runner up

6th Grade
2011 runner up
2010 runner up
2009 runner up

5th Grade
2011 champions
2010 champions
2009 runner up


4th Grade
2011 champions
2010 champions
2009 runner up


Senior Division
2008 champions
2006 champions
2006 runner up
2005 champions
2005 runner up
2003 runners up
2001 champions
2000 champions
1999 champions
1997 champions
1996 runners up
1993 champions
1992 champions
1990 runners up
1989 champions
1988 champions
1987 runners up
1986 runners up
1985 champions
1984 champions

Junior Division
2008 champions
2008 runners up
2007 champions
2007 runners up
2005 champions
2000 runners-up
1998 champions
1996 runners up
1990 runners up
1987 champions
1985 runners up
1984 champions
1983 runners up

Youth Division
2007 champions
2007 runners up
2006 champions
2006 runners up
2004 runners up
2003 champions
2002 champions
2000 champions
1999 runners-up
1997 champions
1997 runners-up
1987 champions
1986 champions
1985 champions
1984 runners up